• PROPOSAL ON PARKING FROM CPM

     

    The Problem:

     

    There is frequent misuse of visitor parking bays. Residents owning multiple vehicles are parking their 2nd or 3rd vehicles within the visitor bays on a daily (or in some cases permanent) basis. Properties on the Graylingwell Estate benefit from either 1 or 2 allocated parking bays. In some cases properties with just one allocated parking bay are being rented to tenants, who often take up short-term occupancy but have more than one vehicle. With visitor bays only requiring the need to display a red visitor permit, residents wishing to use the visitor bays themselves need to simply display their visitor permit inside their own vehicle, they are then free to park for as long or as regularly as they like.

     

    Reason:

     

    There are limited visitor parking spaces on the Graylingwell Estate. Constant misuse of visitor bays results in a knock-on effect, whereby genuine visitors will arrive and be unable to park, many will inevitably park on the roadways (at risk of receiving a PCN) or within allocated private resident bays. When visitors park in allocated resident bays they not only risk receiving a PCN themselves, but they also put at risk the resident who they are inconveniencing (as they too will need to seek alternative parking when they eventually find their space occupied by another vehicle). It is unlikely that a visitor driving into any of the phases and being unable to find a visitor bay will drive back out of the estate and park on the public highway. From experience, visitors at this stage will often breach parking conditions. For these reasons Visitor Bays on residential developments are very important, it is vital that they function correctly and are available for genuine visitors.

     

    Objective

     

    Ensure Visitor Bays are regularly available for genuine visitors. Vehicles in these spaces must turnover frequently, there must be no vehicle abandonment or constant use by any residents.

     

    Solution

     

    Introduce a maximum stay time restriction. We are proposing the following restriction for parking in Visitor Bays at Graylingwell.

    VISITOR BAYS:

    Visitor Permits Holders only,

    Maximum Stay 4 Hours

    (time restriction applies 5pm to midnight on weekdays only).

     

    This time restriction will only apply on weekdays, thus leaving weekends for longer stay genuine visitors. Ultimately this restriction being imposed from Monday to Friday gives some flexibility to genuine visitors staying the weekend, but cleverly disrupts the habits of those abusing the system, particularly overnight. It encourages them to seek alternative parking during the weekdays and in doing so they will hopefully continue good parking behaviour through the weekends.

     

    Examples: A typical resident attempting to park their own vehicle will usually occupy a visitor bay at 6 or 7pm (arriving home from work), at 10 or 11pm the vehicle has reached its maximum stay limit and thus a PCN will be issued. On the other hand, genuine visitors could potentially stay overnight. For example a partner arriving at 8pm could stay until 8am the following morning, as the time restriction of 4 hrs will apply from 8pm and until midnight only, thereafter the time restriction is not imposed and the visitor has until 8am to vacate.

     

    Exemptions: To allow for occasional long-stay visitors, we are also proposing the issuing of Long Stay Visitor Scratch Cards. These scratch cards must be used in conjunction with the standard Visitor Permit. The scratch card will simply allow a user to exempt their vehicle from the 4 hr maximum stay restriction. To ensure fair usage, the scratch card is limited to a maximum number of days a year (14 days per quarter, say). For example a family member staying on holiday with a resident at Graylingwell may park in a visitor bay for 2 weeks if they utilise their scratch card and scratch all 14 days consecutively for that particular quarter. The resident would then have 42 days remaining for that calendar year.